The parents of a young woman who died of a brain hemorrhage around two weeks after graduating from medical school filed a medical malpractice suit against the hospital where the woman received treatment. The West Pittston woman, who graduated from medical school on May 11, 2013, was to start her residency in pediatric medicine shortly thereafter, but she died just 18 days later. When Pennsylvania residents suffer injuries or die due to the negligence of a medical professional, they — or, in the event of their death, their remaining loved ones — are typically entitled to pursue a medical malpractice suit against the negligent party.

According to the suit, the woman’s condition presented signs that directly pointed to a treatable blood clot. Unfortunately, the physicians at the hospital did not discover the gravity of her condition in time. The suit claims that the conduct of the medical staff at the hospital where the woman received treatment went beyond typical negligence into the realm of reckless indifference.

The victim was admitted to the medical facility on May 26, 2013, as a result of a history of headaches and bruising. The victim’s blood tests that the hospital conducted and her symptoms clearly showed that there was a distinct possibility that she was suffering from internal bleeding, the suit says. However, over 44 hours transpired before a staff member decided to have head scans completed.

When Pennsylvania residents receive health care that results in their deaths, the victims’ surviving family members typically choose to pursue medical malpractice suits. If successfully presented, this type of suit may result in the entry of a monetary  judgment for any documented financial damages that the family may have sustained. Medical malpractice victims or their families typically begin this process by seeking the assistance of experienced personal injury attorneys to assess the validity of their claims.

Source: thetimes-tribune.com, “Monday Update: Medical malpractice trial over death of doctor set“, Terrie Morgan-Besecker, Feb. 22, 2016