Patient injured during procedure sues for medical malpractice

When a Pennsylvania resident requires a medical procedure, he or she seeks the help of a medical professional he or she trusts. These medical professionals are highly-trained individuals, but that does not prevent occasional mistakes from occurring. When mistakes occur and patients are injured due to negligence, victims often choose to file medical malpractice suits.

On a recent day in September, one such victim filed a medical malpractice suit against her spinal surgeon, as well as medical firms connected with him. The suit relates to a surgical procedure the woman had undergone. Due to the alleged negligence that took place during the procedure, the woman suffered serious injuries, according to the suit.

The procedure took place in Chicago on Sept. 22, 2011 and involved the doctor performing cervical spine surgery. While the operation was underway, the suit alleges that the surgeon — who was supervising various personnel and assistants from a medical firm — negligently misused surgical retractors. This damaged the woman’s vascular and neurological structures. This injury lead to her suffering neurological, as well as vascular, injuries, in addition to pain and emotional distress. Her suit claims that the injuries she suffered caused and will continue to cause medical expenses and lost wages.

When a Pennsylvania resident suffers an injury due to a medical professional’s negligence, the individual is entitled to pursue a medical malpractice lawsuit against the party or parties responsible. When such a suit is successfully navigated, a monetary judgment for the damages suffered — which can help alleviate some of the costs that are typically associated with these kinds of injuries — is sometimes awarded. A medical malpractice victim often begins this process by consulting with an experienced personal injury attorney in order to assess the validity of his or her claim.

Source: cookcountyrecord.com, “Patient sues doctor, Illinois Spine Institute, alleging malpractice“, Robert Hadley, Sept. 28, 2015